About your local area: ward-level statistics come to OpenlyLocal

Those who follow me on twitter will know that for the past couple of months I’ve been on-and-off looking at the Official for National Statistics Neighbourhood Statistics, and whether it would be possible and useful to show some of that information on OpenlyLocal.

Usually, when I’ve mentioned it on twitter it has usually been in the context of moaning about the less-than-friendly SOAP interface to the data (even by SOAP standards it’s unwieldy). There’s also the not insignificant issue of getting to grips with the huge amount of data, and how it’s stored on the ONS’s servers (at one stage I looked at downloading the raw data, but we’re talking about tens of thousands of files).

Still, like a person with a loose tooth, I’ve worried the problem on and off in quiet times with occasionally painful results (although the people at the ONS have been very helpful), and have now got to a level where (I think) it’s pretty useful.

Specifically, you can now see general demographic info for pretty much all the councils in England & Wales (unfortunately the ONS database doesn’t include Scotland or Northern Ireland, so if there’s anyone who can help me with those areas, I’d be pleased to hear from them).

Area Statistics for Preston Council on OpenlyLocal

More significantly, however, we’ve added a whole load of ward-level statistics:

Example of ward-level ONS statistics

Inevitably, much of the data comes from the 2001 Census (the next is due in 2011), and so it’s not bang up to date. However, it’s still useful and informative, particularly as you can compare the figures with the other wards in the council, or compare councils of similar type. Want to know which ward has the greatest proportion of people over the age of 90 years old. No prob, just click on the description (‘People aged 90 and over in this case) and you have it:

Doing the same on councils will bring up  a comparison with similar councils (e.g. District councils are compared with other district councils, London Authorities with other London Authorities):

As you can see from the list of ONS datasets, there’s huge amounts of data to be shown, and we’ve only imported a small section, in part while we’re working out the best way of making it manageable. As you can see from the religion graph, where it makes more sense for it to be graphed we’ve done it that way, and you can expect to see more of that in the futrue.

It’s also worth mentioning that there are some gaps in the ONS’s database — principally where ward boundaries have changed, or where new local authorities have been formed, and if there’s only a small amount of info for a ward or council, that’s why.

In the meantime, have a play, and if there’s a dataset you want us to expose sooner rather than later, let me know in the comments or via twitter (or email, of course).

C

p.s. In case you’re wondering the graphs and data are fully accessible so should be fine for screenreaders. The comparison tables are just plain ordinary HTML tables with a bit of CSS styling to make them look like graphs, and the pie charts have the underlying data accompanying them as tables on the page (and can be seen by anyone else just by clicking on the chart).

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