The GLA and open data: did he really say that?

The launch on Friday of the Greater London Authority’s open data initiative (aka London Datastore) was a curious affair, and judging from some of the discussions in the pub after, I think that the strangeness – a joint teleconferenced event with CES Las Vegas – possibly overshadowed its significance and the boldness of the GLA’s action.

First off the technology let it down – if Skype wanted to give a demo of just how far short its video conferencing is from prime time they did a perfect job. Boris did a great impromptu stand-up routine, looking for the world like he was still up from the night before, but the people at CES in Las Vegas missed the performance and whose images and words occasionally stuttered in to life to interrupt the windows/skype error messages.

However in between the gags Boris came out with this nugget, “We will open up all the GLA’s data for free reuse”.

What does that mean, I wondered, all their data? All that’s easy to do? Does it include info from TransportForLondon (TfL), the Metropolitan Police? To be honest I sort of assumed it was Boris just paraphrasing. Nevertheless, I thought, it could be a good stick to enforce change later on.

However then it was Deputy Mayor Sir Simon Milton’s turn to give the more scripted, more plodding, more coherent version. This was the bit where we would find out what’s really going to happen. [What you need to realise that the GLA doesn't actually have a lot of its own data - mostly it's just some internal stuff, slices of central government data, and grouping of London council info. The good stuff is owned by those huge bodies, such as TfL and the Met, that it oversees.

So when Steve said: "I hope that our discussions with the GLA group will be fruitful and that in the short term we can encourage them to release that data which is not tied to commercial contracts and in the longer term encourage them when these contracts come up for renewal to apply different contractual principles that would allow for the release of all of their data into the public domain", all I heard was yada yada yada.

The next bit, however, genuinely took me by surprise:

"I can confirm today, however, that as a result of our discussions around the Datastore, TfL are willing to make raw data available through the Datastore. Initially this will be data which is already available for re-use via the TfL website, including live feeds from traffic cameras, geo-coded information on the location of Tube, DLR and Overground stations, the data behind the Findaride service to locate licensed mini-cab and private hire operators and data on planned works affecting weekend Tube services.

"TfL will also be considering how best to make available detailed timetabling data for its services and welcomes examples of other data which could also be prioritised for inclusion in the Datastore such as the data on live departures and Tube incidents on TfL’s website"

So stunned was I in fact (and many others too) we that we didn't ask any questions when he finished talking came to it , or for that matter congratulate Boris/Simon on the steps they were taking.

Yes, it's nothing that hasn't been done in Washington DC or San Francisco, and it isn't as  big a deal as the Government's open data announcement on December 7 (which got scandalously little press coverage, even in the broadsheets, yet may well turn out to be the most important act of this government).

However it is a huge step for local government in the UK and sets a benchmark for other local authorities to attain, and for the GLA to have achieved what it already has with Transport for London will only have come after a considerable trial of will, and one, significantly, that they won.

So, Simon & Boris, and all those who fought the battle with TfL, well done. Now let's see some action with the other GLA bodies - the Met, London Development Agency, London Fire Brigade, he London Pensions Fund Authority in particular (I'm still trying to figure out its relationship to Visit London and the London Travel Watch).

Update: Video embedded below

Useful links:


Opening up Local Spending Reports on OpenlyLocal

As I mentioned in the last post, I’ve recently added council- and ward-level statistics to OpenlyLocal, using the data from the Office of National Statistics Neighbourhood Statistics database. All very well and nice to have it in the same place as the democratic info.

However, what I was really interested in was getting and showing statistics about local areas that’s a bit more, well, meaty. So when I did that statistical backend of OpenlyLocal I wanted to make sure that I could use it for other datasets from other sources.

The first of those is now online, and it’s a good one, the 2006-07 Local Spending Report for England, published in April 2009. What is this? In a nutshell it lists the spending by category for every council in England at the time of the report (there have been a couple of new ones since then).

Now this report has been available to download online if you knew it existed, as a pretty nasty and unwieldy spreadsheet (in fact the recent report to Parliament, Making local public expenditure data public and the development of Local Spending Reports, even has several backhanded references to the inaccessibility of it).

However, unless you enjoy playing with spreadsheets (and at the very minimum know how to unhide hidden sheets and read complex formulae), it’s not much use to you. Much more helpful, I think, is an accessible table you can drill down for more details.

Let’s start with the overview:

Overview of Local Spending by Council for England

Here you can see the total spending for each council over all categories (and also a list of the categories). Click on the magnifying glass at the right of each row and you’ll see a breakdown of spending by main category:

Local Spending breakdown for given council

Click again on the magnifying glass for any row now and you’ll see the breakdown of spending for the category of spending in that row:

Finally (for this part) if you click on the magnifying glass again you’ll get a comparison with councils of the same type (District, County, Unitary, etc) you can compare with other councils:

You can also compare between all councils. From the main page for the Local Spending Dataset, click on one of the categories and it will show you the totals for all councils. Click on one of the topics on that page and it will give you all councils for that topic. Well, hopefully you get the idea. Basically, have a play and give us some feedback.

[There'll also be a summary of the figures appearing on the front page for each council sometime in the next few hours.]

There’s no fancy javascript or visualizations yet (although we are talking with the guys at OKFN,  who do the excellent WhereDoesMyMoneyGo, about collaborating), but that may come. For the moment, we’ve kept it simple, understandable, and accessible.

Comments, mistakes found, questions all welcome in the usual locations (comments below, twitter or email at CountCulture at gmail dot com).



About your local area: ward-level statistics come to OpenlyLocal

Those who follow me on twitter will know that for the past couple of months I’ve been on-and-off looking at the Official for National Statistics Neighbourhood Statistics, and whether it would be possible and useful to show some of that information on OpenlyLocal.

Usually, when I’ve mentioned it on twitter it has usually been in the context of moaning about the less-than-friendly SOAP interface to the data (even by SOAP standards it’s unwieldy). There’s also the not insignificant issue of getting to grips with the huge amount of data, and how it’s stored on the ONS’s servers (at one stage I looked at downloading the raw data, but we’re talking about tens of thousands of files).

Still, like a person with a loose tooth, I’ve worried the problem on and off in quiet times with occasionally painful results (although the people at the ONS have been very helpful), and have now got to a level where (I think) it’s pretty useful.

Specifically, you can now see general demographic info for pretty much all the councils in England & Wales (unfortunately the ONS database doesn’t include Scotland or Northern Ireland, so if there’s anyone who can help me with those areas, I’d be pleased to hear from them).

Area Statistics for Preston Council on OpenlyLocal

More significantly, however, we’ve added a whole load of ward-level statistics:

Example of ward-level ONS statistics

Inevitably, much of the data comes from the 2001 Census (the next is due in 2011), and so it’s not bang up to date. However, it’s still useful and informative, particularly as you can compare the figures with the other wards in the council, or compare councils of similar type. Want to know which ward has the greatest proportion of people over the age of 90 years old. No prob, just click on the description (‘People aged 90 and over in this case) and you have it:

Doing the same on councils will bring up  a comparison with similar councils (e.g. District councils are compared with other district councils, London Authorities with other London Authorities):

As you can see from the list of ONS datasets, there’s huge amounts of data to be shown, and we’ve only imported a small section, in part while we’re working out the best way of making it manageable. As you can see from the religion graph, where it makes more sense for it to be graphed we’ve done it that way, and you can expect to see more of that in the futrue.

It’s also worth mentioning that there are some gaps in the ONS’s database — principally where ward boundaries have changed, or where new local authorities have been formed, and if there’s only a small amount of info for a ward or council, that’s why.

In the meantime, have a play, and if there’s a dataset you want us to expose sooner rather than later, let me know in the comments or via twitter (or email, of course).

C

p.s. In case you’re wondering the graphs and data are fully accessible so should be fine for screenreaders. The comparison tables are just plain ordinary HTML tables with a bit of CSS styling to make them look like graphs, and the pie charts have the underlying data accompanying them as tables on the page (and can be seen by anyone else just by clicking on the chart).


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